In 1964, the iconic furniture design company Herman Miller unveiled an office plan unlike anything anyone had ever seen. Called Action Office, it was the brainchild of Robert Propst, who was among the first designers to argue that office work was mental work and that mental effort was tied to environmental enhancement of one’s physical capabilities. Rather than a furniture item or a collection of them, Action Office was a proposition for an altogether new kind of space.
The Cubicle You Call Hell Was Designed to Set You Free
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In 1964, the iconic furniture design company Herman Miller unveiled an office plan unlike anything anyone had ever seen. Called Action Office, it was the brainchild of Robert Propst, who was among the first designers to argue that office work was mental work and that mental effort was tied to environmental enhancement of one’s physical capabilities. Rather than a furniture item or a collection of them, Action Office was a proposition for an altogether new kind of space.

The Cubicle You Call Hell Was Designed to Set You Free

6themorningnews.org, wired.com, offices, design, Herman Miller, Robert Propst, cubicles, history, headlines,

Google and Microsoft and Netflix and other large, well-capitalized incumbents will pay for speedy service. Smaller companies that can’t—or that ISPs just aren’t interested in dealing with—will get whatever plodding service is left for everyone else. ISPs won’t be allowed to deliberately slow down traffic from specific sites, but that’s about all that’s left of net neutrality.

Net Neutrality Finally Dies at Ripe Old Age of 45

6themorningnews.org, motherjones.com, net neutrality, FCC, Internet, access, business, money, headlines,

Imagine a fantasy world that’s exactly as the world is today except that two things are missing: alcohol and marijuana. And then imagine that tomorrow, both of them are discovered. What happens now? How are each of them used – and, perhaps more importantly, regulated? How would we weigh the relative benefits and costs of alcohol versus marijuana?

What’s More Dangerous: Marijuana or Alcohol?

6themorningnews.org, freakonomics.com, drugs, marijuana, alcohol, regulation, prohibition, costs, benefits, headlines,

As a 3-year-old, Eric was photographed in an embrace with a little girl in a white dress on the city’s North Side. The image carried no identification. Over many decades, he grew more intrigued about the tale behind the girl in the photo, to the point where a fanciful take on her story became central to a book called “Friends” that Eric released last year.

'Easter miracle': Children's author Eric Carle reconnects with lost Syracuse friend after 82 years

6themorningnews.org, syracuse.com, Eric Carle, authors, friends, books, mysteries, photography, headlines,

There’s a new Spider-Man movie in the works, but it’s not the one you’re expecting. Thanks to the magic of crowd-funding, it could be the summer blockbuster nobody sees.

"With Great Power" by Scott Blaszak

6themorningnews.org, Scott Blaszak, Spider-Man, Kickstarter, movies, crowd-funding, spoofs & satire, humor, features, archives,

New building rules will help old folks—who now risk being eaten by bears

Canada’s war on doorknobs: Knobless oblige

6themorningnews.org, economist.com, Canada, doorknobs, design, elderly, bears, headlines,

In his new book, The Thing With Feathers, Noah Strycker says albatrosses have a knack for coupling. “These globe trotters, who mate for life and are incredibly faithful to their partners, just might have the most intense love affairs of any animal on our planet,” he writes.

Introducing A Divorce Rate For Birds, And Guess Which Bird Never, Ever Divorces?

6themorningnews.org, npr.org, Noah Strycker, birds, monogamy, polygamy, animals, biology, illustration, headlines,

Long before “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” the novelist found myth and magic reporting on the Colombian coast.

For García Márquez’s legacy, look to his newspaper journalism

6themorningnews.org, salon.com, Gabriel García Márquez, journalism, newspapers, Colombia, writers, nonfiction, opinions, headlines,

Over the years, the Chesapeake Bay has been known for many things: bountiful seafood, such as clams, oysters and the bay’s iconic blue crabs; its boating, fishing and water sports industry; its curly-haired duck-hunting dogs. Now, however, the bay has become famous for something else: its pollution.

Why Are 20 Far-Away States Trying To Block The Cleanup Of The Chesapeake Bay?

6themorningnews.org, thinkprogress.org, Chesapeake Bay, pollution, politics, environment, agriculture, headlines,

Jessica Rohrer’s meticulous, stylized portraits of her home’s interiors have the visual lure of advertising, but they’re not selling anything, merely asking you to look. Though these are intimate spaces, the objects and scenes in Rohrer’s paintings are also interesting for what they can’t reveal about her life and experiences.

Home Is Where the Art Is by Jessica Rohrer

6themorningnews.org, Jessica Rohrer, artists, painting, home, still life, shopping, products, labels, galleries, archives,

At the same time I started playing D&D, I was transitioning into a new job as CEO of Kickstarter. I initially started playing to hang out with the Kickstarter team. Over time the game has become much more. Here are three things I’ve learned playing D&D.

Life and leadership lessons from Dungeons & Dragons

6themorningnews.org, medium.com, Dungeons & Dragons, role-playing games, life, leadership, essays, headlines,

The Heartbleed Bug exposed a well-known secret: Passwords suck. But that’s really nothing new—just ask the Romans. Explaining the password’s past and future.
"Who Goes There" by Mike Duncan & Jason Novak
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The Heartbleed Bug exposed a well-known secret: Passwords suck. But that’s really nothing new—just ask the Romans. Explaining the password’s past and future.

"Who Goes There" by Mike Duncan & Jason Novak

6themorningnews.org, Mike Duncan, Jason Novak, Heartbleed Bug, passwords, information, systems, history, illustration, collage, features,

Animals sometimes sleep inside the hollows of giant 2,000-year old baobab trees in South Africa. Humans too, sometimes use old trees, for more dubious purposes — a jail, a toilet, a pop-up bar — as photographer Rachel Sussman discovered when she toured the world to photograph ancient trees and other organisms for her new book, The Oldest Living Things in the World.

These Are Some of the Oldest Living Things on Earth

6themorningnews.org, wired.com, Rachel Sussman, photography, life, biology, nature, headlines,

Compilers of the next edition of the Oxford English Dictionary fear the mammoth masterpiece can only appear online as printed volumes will not be commerically viable

RIP for OED as world’s finest dictionary goes out of print

6themorningnews.org, telegraph.co.uk, Oxford English Dictionary, OED, publishing, technology, media, headlines,

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